Articles | Volume 14, issue 10
Clim. Past, 14, 1463–1485, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-14-1463-2018
Clim. Past, 14, 1463–1485, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-14-1463-2018

Research article 19 Oct 2018

Research article | 19 Oct 2018

Eemian Greenland SMB strongly sensitive to model choice

Andreas Plach et al.

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Cited articles

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American Meteorological Society: Moist-adiabatic lapse rate, Glossary of Meteorology, available at: http://glossary.ametsoc.org/wiki/Moist-adiabatic_lapse_rate (last access: 20 February 2018), 2018. a
Bakker, P., Stone, E. J., Charbit, S., Gröger, M., Krebs-Kanzow, U., Ritz, S. P., Varma, V., Khon, V., Lunt, D. J., Mikolajewicz, U., Prange, M., Renssen, H., Schneider, B., and Schulz, M.: Last interglacial temperature evolution – a model inter-comparison, Clim. Past, 9, 605–619, https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-9-605-2013, 2013. a
Bamber, J. L., Griggs, J. A., Hurkmans, R. T. W. L., Dowdeswell, J. A., Gogineni, S. P., Howat, I., Mouginot, J., Paden, J., Palmer, S., Rignot, E., and Steinhage, D.: A new bed elevation dataset for Greenland, The Cryosphere, 7, 499–510, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-7-499-2013, 2013. a, b
Barnola, J.-M., Pimienta, P., Raynaud, D., and Korotkevich, Y. S.: CO2-climate relationship as deduced from the Vostok ice core: a re-examination based on new measurements and on a re-evluation of the air dating, Tellus B, 43, 83–90, 1990. a
Short summary
The Greenland ice sheet is a huge frozen water reservoir which is crucial for predictions of sea level in a warming future climate. Therefore, computer models are needed to reliably simulate the melt of ice sheets. In this study, we use climate model simulations of the last period where it was warmer than today in Greenland. We test different melt models under these climatic conditions and show that the melt models show very different results under these warmer conditions.