Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2020-38
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2020-38
06 Apr 2020
 | 06 Apr 2020
Status: this discussion paper is a preprint. It has been under review for the journal Climate of the Past (CP). The manuscript was not accepted for further review after discussion.

Rapid waxing and waning of Beringian ice sheet reconcile glacial climate records from around North Pacific

Zhongshi Zhang, Qing Yan, Ran Zhang, Florence Colleoni, Gilles Ramstein, Gaowen Dai, Martin Jakobsson, Matt O'Regan, Stefan Liess, Denis-Didier Rousseau, Naiqing Wu, Elizabeth J. Farmer, Camille Contoux, Chuncheng Guo, Ning Tan, and Zhengtang Guo

Abstract. Throughout the Pleistocene the Earth has experienced pronounced glacial-interglacial cycles, which have been debated for decades. One concept widely held is that during most glacials only the Laurentide-Eurasian ice sheets across North America and Northwest Eurasia became expansive, while Northeast Siberia-Beringia remained ice-sheet-free. However, the recognition of glacial landforms and deposits on Northeast Siberia-Beringia and off the Siberian continental shelf is beginning to call into question this paradigm. Here, we combine climate and ice sheet modelling with well-dated paleoclimate records from the mid-to-high latitude North Pacific to demonstrate the episodic occurrences of an ice sheet across Northeast Siberia-Beringia. Our simulations first show that the paleoclimate records are irreconcilable with the established paradigm of Laurentide-Eurasia-only ice sheets, and then reveal that a Beringian ice sheet over Northeast Siberia-Beringia causes feedbacks between atmosphere and ocean, the result of which better explains these climate records from around the North Pacific during the past four glacial-interglacial cycles. Our simulations propose an alternative scenario for NH ice sheet evolution, which involves the rapid waxing and waning of the Beringian ice sheet alongside the growth of the Laurentide-Eurasian ice sheets. The new scenario settles the long-standing discrepancies between the direct glacial evidence and the climate evolution from around the mid-to-high latitude North Pacific. It depicts a high complexity in glacial climates and has important implications for our understanding of the dispersal of prehistoric humans through Beringia into North America.

Zhongshi Zhang et al.

 
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Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Zhongshi Zhang et al.

Zhongshi Zhang et al.

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Latest update: 03 Jun 2023
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Short summary
Whether an ice sheet once grew over Northeast Siberia-Beringia has been debated for decades. By comparing climate modelling with paleoclimate and glacial records from around the North Pacific, this study shows that the Laurentide-Eurasia-only ice sheet configuration fails in explaining these records, while a scenario involving the ice sheet over Northeast Siberia-Beringia succeeds. It highlights the complexity in glacial climates and urges new investigations across Northeast Siberia-Beringia.