Articles | Volume 15, issue 1
Clim. Past, 15, 217–236, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-15-217-2019
Clim. Past, 15, 217–236, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-15-217-2019

Research article 06 Feb 2019

Research article | 06 Feb 2019

Mercury anomalies across the Palaeocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum

Morgan T. Jones et al.

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Cited articles

Aarnes, I., Planke, S., Trulsvik, M., and Svensen, H.: Contact metamorphism and thermogenic gas generation in the Vøring and Møre basins, offshore Norway, during the Paleocene–Eocene thermal maximum, J. Geol. Soc., 172, 588–598, https://doi.org/10.1144/jgs2014-098, 2015. 
Babila, T. L., Rosenthal, Y., Wright, J. D., and Miller, K. G.: A continental shelf perspective of ocean acidification and temperature evolution during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum, Geology, 44, 275–278, 2016. 
Backman, J., Moran, K., McInroy, D. B., Mayer, L. A., and the Expedition 302 Scientists: Proc. IODP, 302, Edinburgh (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Management International, Inc.), https://doi.org/10.2204/iodp.proc.302.101.2006, 2004. 
Baines, P. G. and Sparks, R. S. J.: Dynamics of giant volcanic ash clouds from supervolcanic eruptions, Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L24808, https://doi.org/10.1029/2005GL024597, 2005. 
Baines, P. G., Jones, M. T., and Sparks, R. S. J.: The variation of large-magnitude volcanic ash cloud formation with source latitude, J. Geophys. Res., 113, D21204, https://doi.org/10.1029/2007JD009568, 2008. 
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Mercury anomalies in sedimentary rocks are used to assess whether there were periods of elevated volcanism in the geological record. We focus on five sites that cover the Palaeocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum, an extreme global warming event that occurred 55.8 million years ago. We find that sites close to the eruptions from the North Atlantic Igneous Province display significant mercury anomalies across this time interval, suggesting that magmatism played a role in the global warming event.