Articles | Volume 14, issue 2
Clim. Past, 14, 215–238, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-14-215-2018
Clim. Past, 14, 215–238, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-14-215-2018

Research article 23 Feb 2018

Research article | 23 Feb 2018

Sensitivity of the Eocene climate to CO2 and orbital variability

John S. Keery et al.

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (15 Jul 2017) by Arne Winguth
AR by John Keery on behalf of the Authors (25 Aug 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (25 Sep 2017) by Arne Winguth
RR by David De Vleeschouwer (16 Oct 2017)
RR by Michel Crucifix (02 Nov 2017)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (21 Nov 2017) by Arne Winguth
AR by John Keery on behalf of the Authors (01 Jan 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (14 Jan 2018) by Arne Winguth
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Short summary
In the Eocene (~ 55 million years ago), the Earth had high levels of atmospheric CO2, so studies of the Eocene can provide insights into the likely effects of present-day fossil fuel burning. We ran a low-resolution but very fast climate model with 50 combinations of CO2 and orbital parameters, and an Eocene layout of the oceans and continents. Climatic effects of CO2 are dominant but precession and obliquity strongly influence monsoon rainfall and ocean–land temperature contrasts, respectively.