Journal cover Journal topic
Climate of the Past An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

IF value: 3.536
IF3.536
IF 5-year value: 3.967
IF 5-year
3.967
CiteScore value: 6.6
CiteScore
6.6
SNIP value: 1.262
SNIP1.262
IPP value: 3.90
IPP3.90
SJR value: 2.185
SJR2.185
Scimago H <br class='widget-line-break'>index value: 71
Scimago H
index
71
h5-index value: 40
h5-index40
CP | Articles | Volume 14, issue 2
Clim. Past, 14, 215–238, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-14-215-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Clim. Past, 14, 215–238, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-14-215-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 23 Feb 2018

Research article | 23 Feb 2018

Sensitivity of the Eocene climate to CO2 and orbital variability

John S. Keery et al.

Model code and software

PLASIM--GENIE v1.0: a new intermediate complexity AOGCM P. B. Holden, N. R. Edwards, K. Fraedrich, E. Kirk, F. Lunkeit, and X. Zhu https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-9-3347-2016

Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
In the Eocene (~ 55 million years ago), the Earth had high levels of atmospheric CO2, so studies of the Eocene can provide insights into the likely effects of present-day fossil fuel burning. We ran a low-resolution but very fast climate model with 50 combinations of CO2 and orbital parameters, and an Eocene layout of the oceans and continents. Climatic effects of CO2 are dominant but precession and obliquity strongly influence monsoon rainfall and ocean–land temperature contrasts, respectively.
In the Eocene (~ 55 million years ago), the Earth had high levels of atmospheric CO2, so studies...
Citation