Articles | Volume 17, issue 1
Clim. Past, 17, 507–528, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-17-507-2021
Clim. Past, 17, 507–528, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-17-507-2021

Research article 25 Feb 2021

Research article | 25 Feb 2021

Lower oceanic δ13C during the last interglacial period compared to the Holocene

Shannon A. Bengtson et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (05 Oct 2020) by Marit-Solveig Seidenkrantz
AR by Shannon Bengtson on behalf of the Authors (12 Oct 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (20 Oct 2020) by Marit-Solveig Seidenkrantz
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (27 Oct 2020)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (26 Nov 2020)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (26 Nov 2020) by Marit-Solveig Seidenkrantz
AR by Shannon Bengtson on behalf of the Authors (14 Dec 2020)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (15 Dec 2020) by Marit-Solveig Seidenkrantz
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Short summary
The last interglacial was a warm period that may provide insights into future climates. Here, we compile and analyse stable carbon isotope data from the ocean during the last interglacial and compare it to the Holocene. The data show that Atlantic Ocean circulation was similar during the last interglacial and the Holocene. We also establish a difference in the mean oceanic carbon isotopic ratio between these periods, which was most likely caused by burial and weathering carbon fluxes.