Articles | Volume 17, issue 3
Clim. Past, 17, 1139–1159, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-17-1139-2021

Special issue: Reconstructing Southern Ocean sea-ice dynamics on glacial-to-historical...

Clim. Past, 17, 1139–1159, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-17-1139-2021

Research article 07 Jun 2021

Research article | 07 Jun 2021

Impact of Southern Ocean surface conditions on deep ocean circulation during the LGM: a model analysis

Fanny Lhardy et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (26 Feb 2021) by Alice Marzocchi
AR by Fanny Lhardy on behalf of the Authors (03 Mar 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (04 Mar 2021) by Alice Marzocchi
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (29 Mar 2021)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (08 Apr 2021)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (13 Apr 2021) by Alice Marzocchi
AR by Fanny Lhardy on behalf of the Authors (22 Apr 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (27 Apr 2021) by Alice Marzocchi
AR by Fanny Lhardy on behalf of the Authors (28 Apr 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Climate models struggle to simulate a LGM ocean circulation in agreement with paleotracer data. Using a set of simulations, we test the impact of boundary conditions and other modelling choices. Model–data comparisons of sea-surface temperatures and sea-ice cover support an overall cold Southern Ocean, with implications on the AMOC strength. Changes in implemented boundary conditions are not sufficient to simulate a shallower AMOC; other mechanisms to better represent convection are required.