Articles | Volume 15, issue 4
Clim. Past, 15, 1603–1619, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-15-1603-2019
Clim. Past, 15, 1603–1619, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-15-1603-2019

Research article 15 Aug 2019

Research article | 15 Aug 2019

Modelling ice sheet evolution and atmospheric CO2 during the Late Pliocene

Constantijn J. Berends et al.

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Cited articles

Alley, R. B.: The Younger Dryas cold interval as viewed from central Greenland, Quaternary Sci. Rev., 19, 213–226, 2000. 
Bachem, P. E., Risebrobakken, B., De Schepper, S., and McClymont, E. L.: Highly variable Pliocene sea surface conditions in the Norwegian Sea, Clim. Past, 13, 1153–1168, https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-13-1153-2017, 2017. 
Badger, M. P. S., Schmidt, D. N., Mackensen, A., and Pancost, R. D.: High-resolution alkenone palaeobarometry indicates relatively stable pCO2 during the Pliocene (3.3–2.8 Ma), Philos. T. R. Soc. A, 371, https://doi.org/10.1098/rsta.2013.0094, 2013. 
Bartoli, G., Hönisch, B., and Zeebe, R. E.: Atmospheric CO2 decline during the Pliocene intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciations, Paleoceanography, 26, https://doi.org/10.1029/2010PA002055, 2011. 
Berends, C. J., de Boer, B., and van de Wal, R. S. W.: Application of HadCM3@Bristolv1.0 simulations of paleoclimate as forcing for an ice-sheet model, ANICE2.1: set-up and benchmark experiments, Geosci. Model Dev., 11, 4657–4675, https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-11-4657-2018, 2018. 
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Short summary
The Late Pliocene, 3.65–2.75 million years ago, is the most recent period in Earth's history that was warmer than the present. This makes it interesting for climatological research, because it provides a possible analogue for the near future. We used a coupled ice-sheet–climate model to simulate the behaviour of these systems during this period. We show that the warmest moment saw a sea-level rise of 8–14 m, with a CO2 concentration of 320–400 ppmv.