Articles | Volume 18, issue 3
Clim. Past, 18, 559–577, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-18-559-2022
Clim. Past, 18, 559–577, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-18-559-2022
Research article
30 Mar 2022
Research article | 30 Mar 2022

Biomarker proxy records of Arctic climate change during the Mid-Pleistocene transition from Lake El'gygytgyn (Far East Russia)

Kurt R. Lindberg et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on cp-2021-66', Savannah Worne, 27 Jul 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Kurt Lindberg, 20 Sep 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on cp-2021-66', Anonymous Referee #2, 09 Aug 2021
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Kurt Lindberg, 20 Sep 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (10 Oct 2021) by Zhengtang Guo
AR by Kurt Lindberg on behalf of the Authors (20 Nov 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (28 Nov 2021) by Zhengtang Guo
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (08 Dec 2021)
RR by Savannah Worne (17 Jan 2022)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (31 Jan 2022) by Zhengtang Guo
AR by Kurt Lindberg on behalf of the Authors (02 Feb 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (09 Feb 2022) by Zhengtang Guo
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Short summary
Earth experiences regular ice ages resulting in shifts between cooler and warmer climates. Around 1 million years ago, the ice age cycles grew longer and stronger. We used bacterial and plant lipids preserved in an Arctic lake to reconstruct temperature and vegetation during this climate transition. We find that Arctic land temperatures did not cool much compared to ocean records from this period, and that vegetation shifts correspond with a long-term drying previously reported in the region.