Articles | Volume 18, issue 5
Clim. Past, 18, 1109–1124, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-18-1109-2022
Clim. Past, 18, 1109–1124, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-18-1109-2022
Research article
23 May 2022
Research article | 23 May 2022

Expression of the “4.2 ka event” in the southern Rocky Mountains, USA

David T. Liefert and Bryan N. Shuman

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on cp-2021-149', Anonymous Referee #1, 14 Dec 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', David Liefert, 23 Dec 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on cp-2021-149', Anonymous Referee #2, 11 Jan 2022
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', David Liefert, 02 Mar 2022
  • RC3: 'Comment on cp-2021-149', Anonymous Referee #2, 12 Jan 2022
    • AC3: 'Reply on RC3', David Liefert, 02 Mar 2022

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (20 Mar 2022) by Keely Mills
AR by David Liefert on behalf of the Authors (06 Apr 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (09 May 2022) by Keely Mills
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Short summary
A large drought potentially occurred roughly 4200 years ago, but its impacts and significance are unclear. We find new evidence in carbonate oxygen isotopes from a mountain lake in southeastern Wyoming, southern Rocky Mountains, of an abrupt reduction in effective moisture (precipitation–evaporation) or snowpack from approximately 4200–4000 years ago. The drought's prominence among a growing number of sites in the North American interior suggests it was a regionally substantial climate event.