Articles | Volume 17, issue 1
Clim. Past, 17, 361–377, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-17-361-2021

Special issue: Oldest Ice: finding and interpreting climate proxies in ice...

Clim. Past, 17, 361–377, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-17-361-2021

Research article 01 Feb 2021

Research article | 01 Feb 2021

Reconstructing the evolution of ice sheets, sea level, and atmospheric CO2 during the past 3.6 million years

Constantijn J. Berends et al.

Download

Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (24 Jul 2020) by Ed Brook
AR by Tijn Berends on behalf of the Authors (17 Aug 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (24 Sep 2020) by Ed Brook
RR by Andrey Ganopolski (15 Oct 2020)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (24 Nov 2020) by Ed Brook
AR by Tijn Berends on behalf of the Authors (26 Nov 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (15 Dec 2020) by Ed Brook
Download
Short summary
For the past 2.6 million years, the Earth has experienced glacial cycles, where vast ice sheets periodically grew to cover large parts of North America and Eurasia. In the earlier part of this period, this happened every 40 000 years. This value changed 1.2 million years ago to 100 000 years: the Mid-Pleistocene Transition. We investigate this interesting period using an ice-sheet model, studying the interactions between ice sheets and the global climate.