Articles | Volume 17, issue 1
Clim. Past, 17, 361–377, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-17-361-2021

Special issue: Oldest Ice: finding and interpreting climate proxies in ice...

Clim. Past, 17, 361–377, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-17-361-2021

Research article 01 Feb 2021

Research article | 01 Feb 2021

Reconstructing the evolution of ice sheets, sea level, and atmospheric CO2 during the past 3.6 million years

Constantijn J. Berends et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 2,387 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
1,627 706 54 2,387 55 67
  • HTML: 1,627
  • PDF: 706
  • XML: 54
  • Total: 2,387
  • BibTeX: 55
  • EndNote: 67
Views and downloads (calculated since 24 Apr 2020)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 24 Apr 2020)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 1,949 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 1,942 with geography defined and 7 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Latest update: 19 Sep 2021
Download
Short summary
For the past 2.6 million years, the Earth has experienced glacial cycles, where vast ice sheets periodically grew to cover large parts of North America and Eurasia. In the earlier part of this period, this happened every 40 000 years. This value changed 1.2 million years ago to 100 000 years: the Mid-Pleistocene Transition. We investigate this interesting period using an ice-sheet model, studying the interactions between ice sheets and the global climate.