Articles | Volume 16, issue 1
Clim. Past, 16, 79–99, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-16-79-2020
Clim. Past, 16, 79–99, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-16-79-2020

Research article 10 Jan 2020

Research article | 10 Jan 2020

South Pacific Subtropical High from the late Holocene to the end of the 21st century: insights from climate proxies and general circulation models

Valentina Flores-Aqueveque et al.

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (24 Oct 2019) by Laurie Menviel
AR by Valentina Flores-Aqueveque on behalf of the Authors (25 Oct 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (30 Oct 2019) by Laurie Menviel
AR by Anna Wenzel on behalf of the Authors (26 Nov 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (27 Nov 2019) by Laurie Menviel
AR by Valentina Flores-Aqueveque on behalf of the Authors (29 Nov 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
The South Pacific Subtropical High (SPSH) is a main feature of the South American (SA) climate. We analyzed its behavior during two extreme temperature events based on paleoclimate records and climate models. The SPSH expands (contracts) in warm (cold) periods. The changes affect other elements of the SA climate like the strength of the southerly winds and the position of the westerly wind belt. Projections indicate that this expansion and its consequences will continue during the 21st century.