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Climate of the Past An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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IF value: 3.536
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Volume 14, issue 3
Clim. Past, 14, 321–338, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-14-321-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Clim. Past, 14, 321–338, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-14-321-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 08 Mar 2018

Research article | 08 Mar 2018

Reinforcing the North Atlantic backbone: revision and extension of the composite splice at ODP Site 982

Anna Joy Drury et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (08 Dec 2017) by Pierre Francus
AR by Anna Joy Drury on behalf of the Authors (30 Dec 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (17 Jan 2018) by Pierre Francus
AR by Anna Wenzel on behalf of the Authors (19 Jan 2018)  Author's response
ED: Publish as is (19 Jan 2018) by Pierre Francus
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
North Atlantic Site 982 is key to our understanding of climate evolution over the past 12 million years. However, the stratigraphy and age model are unverified. We verify the composite splice using XRF core scanning data and establish a revised benthic foraminiferal stable isotope astrochronology from 8.0–4.5 million years ago. Our new stratigraphy accurately correlates the Atlantic and the Mediterranean and suggests a connection between late Miocene cooling and dynamic ice sheet expansion.
North Atlantic Site 982 is key to our understanding of climate evolution over the past 12...
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