Articles | Volume 18, issue 4
Clim. Past, 18, 759–774, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-18-759-2022
Clim. Past, 18, 759–774, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-18-759-2022
Research article
12 Apr 2022
Research article | 12 Apr 2022

Climate and ocean circulation in the aftermath of a Marinoan snowball Earth

Lennart Ramme and Jochem Marotzke

Download

Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on cp-2021-180', Anonymous Referee #1, 17 Jan 2022
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Lennart Ramme, 10 Feb 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on cp-2021-180', Anonymous Referee #2, 07 Feb 2022
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Lennart Ramme, 10 Feb 2022

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (14 Mar 2022) by Yannick Donnadieu
AR by Lennart Ramme on behalf of the Authors (14 Mar 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (15 Mar 2022) by Yannick Donnadieu
Download
Short summary
After the Marinoan snowball Earth, the climate warmed rapidly due to enhanced greenhouse conditions, and the freshwater inflow of melting glaciers caused a strong stratification of the ocean. Our climate simulations reveal a potentially only moderate global temperature increase and a break-up of the stratification within just a few thousand years. The findings give insights into the environmental conditions relevant for the geological and biological evolution during that time.