Articles | Volume 18, issue 1
Clim. Past, 18, 45–65, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-18-45-2022

Special issue: Interdisciplinary studies of volcanic impacts on climate and...

Clim. Past, 18, 45–65, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-18-45-2022

Research article 18 Jan 2022

Research article | 18 Jan 2022

No evidence for tephra in Greenland from the historic eruption of Vesuvius in 79 CE: implications for geochronology and paleoclimatology

Gill Plunkett et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on cp-2021-63', Lauren Davies, 26 Jul 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on cp-2021-63', Eliza Cook, 26 Jul 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Gill Plunkett, 28 Sep 2021
  • CC1: 'Comment on cp-2021-63: a well written and significant paper', Larry Mastin, 10 Aug 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Gill Plunkett, 28 Sep 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (05 Dec 2021) by Céline Vidal
AR by Gill Plunkett on behalf of the Authors (06 Dec 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (07 Dec 2021) by Céline Vidal
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Short summary
We report the identification of volcanic ash associated with a sulfate layer in Greenland ice cores previously thought to have been from the Vesuvius 79 CE eruption and which had been used to confirm the precise dating of the Greenland ice-core chronology. We find that the tephra was probably produced by an eruption in Alaska. We show the importance of verifying sources of volcanic signals in ice cores through ash analysis to avoid errors in dating ice cores and interpreting volcanic impacts.