Articles | Volume 18, issue 2
Clim. Past, 18, 363–380, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-18-363-2022
Clim. Past, 18, 363–380, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-18-363-2022

Research article 28 Feb 2022

Research article | 28 Feb 2022

Long-term trends in diatom diversity and palaeoproductivity: a 16 000-year multidecadal record from Lake Baikal, southern Siberia

Anson W. Mackay et al.

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (07 Feb 2021) by Keely Mills
AR by Anson Mackay on behalf of the Authors (02 Nov 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (22 Nov 2021) by Keely Mills
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (04 Dec 2021)
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (06 Dec 2021) by Keely Mills
AR by Anson Mackay on behalf of the Authors (07 Dec 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
We investigated the diversity of algae called diatoms in Lake Baikal, the oldest and deepest lake in the world, because algae sit at the base of aquatic foodwebs and provide energy (in the form of primary production) for other organisms to use. Diatom diversity and primary production have been influenced by both long-term and abrupt climate change over the past 16 000 years. The shape of these responses appears to be time-period specific.