Articles | Volume 18, issue 9
Clim. Past, 18, 2117–2142, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-18-2117-2022

Special issue: Publications by EGU Medallists

Clim. Past, 18, 2117–2142, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-18-2117-2022
Review article
 | Highlight paper
14 Sep 2022
Review article  | Highlight paper | 14 Sep 2022

Shallow marine carbonates as recorders of orbitally induced past climate changes – example from the Oxfordian of the Swiss Jura Mountains

André Strasser

Viewed

Total article views: 685 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
519 140 26 685 10 11
  • HTML: 519
  • PDF: 140
  • XML: 26
  • Total: 685
  • BibTeX: 10
  • EndNote: 11
Views and downloads (calculated since 25 Mar 2022)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 25 Mar 2022)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 642 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 642 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Latest update: 28 Sep 2022
Co-editor-in-chief
The paper presents an interesting review of deep time ecosystems and suggests that the interpretation of the evolution of ancient sedimentary systems can be refined and better compared to today’s changes in ecosystems. Concerning the rate of climate change, this study implies that anthropogenically induced global warming and subsequent sea level rise today occurs more than ten times faster than the fastest rise reconstructed for the Oxfordian (159 Ma - 154 Ma)
Short summary
Some 155 million years ago, sediments were deposited in a shallow subtropical sea. Coral reefs formed in a warm and arid climate during high sea level, and clays were washed into the ocean at low sea level and when it rained. Climate and sea level changes were induced by cyclical insolation changes. Analysing the sedimentary record, it appears that sea level rise today (as a result of global warming) is more than 10 times faster than the fastest rise reconstructed from the geologic past.