Articles | Volume 18, issue 9
Clim. Past, 18, 2117–2142, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-18-2117-2022

Special issue: Publications by EGU Medallists

Clim. Past, 18, 2117–2142, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-18-2117-2022
Review article
 | Highlight paper
14 Sep 2022
Review article  | Highlight paper | 14 Sep 2022

Shallow marine carbonates as recorders of orbitally induced past climate changes – example from the Oxfordian of the Swiss Jura Mountains

André Strasser

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on egusphere-2022-74', Marc Aurell, 19 May 2022
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', André Strasser, 19 May 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on egusphere-2022-74', Simon Andrieu, 17 Jun 2022
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', André Strasser, 19 Jun 2022

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (03 Aug 2022) by Denis-Didier Rousseau
AR by André Strasser on behalf of the Authors (04 Aug 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (09 Aug 2022) by Denis-Didier Rousseau
AR by André Strasser on behalf of the Authors (09 Aug 2022)  Author's response    Manuscript
Co-editor-in-chief
The paper presents an interesting review of deep time ecosystems and suggests that the interpretation of the evolution of ancient sedimentary systems can be refined and better compared to today’s changes in ecosystems. Concerning the rate of climate change, this study implies that anthropogenically induced global warming and subsequent sea level rise today occurs more than ten times faster than the fastest rise reconstructed for the Oxfordian (159 Ma - 154 Ma)
Short summary
Some 155 million years ago, sediments were deposited in a shallow subtropical sea. Coral reefs formed in a warm and arid climate during high sea level, and clays were washed into the ocean at low sea level and when it rained. Climate and sea level changes were induced by cyclical insolation changes. Analysing the sedimentary record, it appears that sea level rise today (as a result of global warming) is more than 10 times faster than the fastest rise reconstructed from the geologic past.