Articles | Volume 18, issue 5
Clim. Past, 18, 1203–1229, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-18-1203-2022
Clim. Past, 18, 1203–1229, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-18-1203-2022
Research article
30 May 2022
Research article | 30 May 2022

Sclerochronological evidence of pronounced seasonality from the late Pliocene of the southern North Sea basin and its implications

Andrew L. A. Johnson et al.

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Cited articles

Alexandroff, S. J., Butler, P. G., Hollyman, P. R., Schöne, B. R., and Scourse, J. D.: Late Holocene seasonal temperature variability of the western Scottish shelf (St Kilda) recorded in fossil shells of the bivalve Glycymeris glycymeris, Palaeogeogr. Palaeocl., 562, 110146, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.palaeo.2020.110146, 2021. 
Arthur, M. A., Williams, D. F., and Jones, D. S.: Seasonal temperature-salinity changes and thermocline development in the mid-Atlantic Bight as recorded by the isotopic composition of bivalves, Geology, 11, 655–659, https://doi.org/10.1130/0091-7613(1983)11<655:STCATD>2.0.CO;2, 1983. 
Bachem, P. E., Risebrobakken, B., De Schepper, S., and McClymont, E. L.: Highly variable Pliocene sea surface conditions in the Norwegian Sea, Clim. Past, 13, 1153–1168, https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-13-1153-2017, 2017. 
Bemis, B. E., Spero, H. J., Bijma, J., and Lea, D. W.: Reevaluation of the oxygen isotopic composition of planktonic foraminifera: Experimental results and revised paleotemperature equations, Paleoceanography, 13, 150–160, https://doi.org/10.1029/98PA00070, 1998. 
Bice, K. L., Arthur, M. A., and Marincovich, L.: Late Paleocene Arctic Ocean shallow-marine temperatures from mollusc stable isotopes, Paleoceanography, 11, 241–249, https://doi.org/10.1029/96PA00813, 1996. 
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Short summary
Determining seasonal temperatures demands proxies that record the highest and lowest temperatures over the annual cycle. Many record neither, but oxygen isotope profiles from shells in principle record both. Oxygen isotope data from late Pliocene bivalve molluscs of the southern North Sea basin show that the seasonal temperature range was at times much higher than previously estimated and higher than now. This suggests reduced oceanic heat supply, in contrast to some previous interpretations.