Articles | Volume 18, issue 5
Clim. Past, 18, 1203–1229, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-18-1203-2022
Clim. Past, 18, 1203–1229, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-18-1203-2022
Research article
30 May 2022
Research article | 30 May 2022

Sclerochronological evidence of pronounced seasonality from the late Pliocene of the southern North Sea basin and its implications

Andrew L. A. Johnson et al.

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Short summary
Determining seasonal temperatures demands proxies that record the highest and lowest temperatures over the annual cycle. Many record neither, but oxygen isotope profiles from shells in principle record both. Oxygen isotope data from late Pliocene bivalve molluscs of the southern North Sea basin show that the seasonal temperature range was at times much higher than previously estimated and higher than now. This suggests reduced oceanic heat supply, in contrast to some previous interpretations.