Articles | Volume 17, issue 2
Clim. Past, 17, 565–585, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-17-565-2021

Special issue: Interdisciplinary studies of volcanic impacts on climate and...

Clim. Past, 17, 565–585, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-17-565-2021

Research article 04 Mar 2021

Research article | 04 Mar 2021

Cryptotephra from the Icelandic Veiðivötn 1477 CE eruption in a Greenland ice core: confirming the dating of volcanic events in the 1450s CE and assessing the eruption's climatic impact

Peter M. Abbott et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (04 Dec 2020) by Matthew Toohey
AR by Peter Abbott on behalf of the Authors (08 Jan 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (28 Jan 2021) by Matthew Toohey
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Short summary
Volcanic eruptions are a key source of climatic variability, and greater understanding of their past influence will increase the accuracy of future projections. We use volcanic ash from a 1477 CE Icelandic eruption in a Greenlandic ice core as a temporal fix point to constrain the timing of two eruptions in the 1450s CE and their climatic impact. Despite being the most explosive Icelandic eruption in the last 1200 years, the 1477 CE event had a limited impact on Northern Hemisphere climate.