Articles | Volume 17, issue 6
Clim. Past, 17, 2607–2632, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-17-2607-2021

Special issue: Interdisciplinary studies of volcanic impacts on climate and...

Clim. Past, 17, 2607–2632, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-17-2607-2021

Research article 20 Dec 2021

Research article | 20 Dec 2021

The blue suns of 1831: was the eruption of Ferdinandea, near Sicily, one of the largest volcanic climate forcing events of the nineteenth century?

Christopher Garrison et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on cp-2021-78', Anonymous Referee #1, 20 Aug 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on cp-2021-78', Fred Prata, 02 Sep 2021
  • RC3: 'Comment on cp-2021-78', Anonymous Referee #3, 09 Sep 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish as is (01 Nov 2021) by Francis Ludlow
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Short summary
An unidentified eruption in 1831 was one of the largest volcanic climate forcing events of the nineteenth century. We use reported observations of a blue sun to reconstruct the transport of an aerosol plume from that eruption and, hence, identify it as the 1831 eruption of Ferdinandea, near Sicily. We propose that, although it was only a modest eruption, its volcanic plume was enriched with sulfur from sedimentary deposits and that meteorological conditions helped it reach the stratosphere.