Articles | Volume 17, issue 1
Clim. Past, 17, 253–267, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-17-253-2021
Clim. Past, 17, 253–267, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-17-253-2021
Research article
 | Highlight paper
27 Jan 2021
Research article  | Highlight paper | 27 Jan 2021

Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) climate forcing and ocean dynamical feedback and their implications for estimating climate sensitivity

Jiang Zhu and Christopher J. Poulsen

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Latest update: 08 Aug 2022
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Short summary
Climate sensitivity has been directly calculated from paleoclimate data. This approach relies on good understandings of climate forcings and interactions within the Earth system. We conduct Last Glacial Maximum simulations using a climate model to quantify the forcing and efficacy of ice sheets and greenhouse gases and to directly estimate climate sensitivity in the model. Results suggest that the direct calculation overestimates the truth by 25 % due to neglecting ocean dynamical feedback.