Articles | Volume 17, issue 5
Clim. Past, 17, 2091–2117, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-17-2091-2021
Clim. Past, 17, 2091–2117, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-17-2091-2021

Research article 15 Oct 2021

Research article | 15 Oct 2021

Climate, cryosphere and carbon cycle controls on Southeast Atlantic orbital-scale carbonate deposition since the Oligocene (30–0 Ma)

Anna Joy Drury et al.

Data sets

Climate, cryosphere and carbon cycle controls on Southeast Atlantic orbital-scale carbonate deposition since the Oligocene (30-0 Ma) A. J. Drury, D. Liebrand, T. Westerhold, H. M. Beddow, D. A. Hodell, N. Rohlfs, R. H. Wilkens, M. W. Lyle, D. B. Bell, D. Kroon, H. Pälike, and L. J. Lourens https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.919489

Video supplement

Disentangling the controls and orbital pacing of South-East Atlantic carbonate deposition since the Oligocene (30–0 Ma) A. J. Drury, D. Liebrand, T. Westerhold, H. Beddow, D. A. Hodell, N. Rohlfs, R. H. Wilkens, M. Lyle, D. B.., Bell, D. Kroon, D. De Vleeschouwer, M. Vahlenkamp, F. Rochholz, H. Palike, and L. J. Lourens https://youtu.be/G30Eo0twx9s

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Short summary
We use the first high-resolution southeast Atlantic carbonate record to see how climate dynamics evolved since 30 million years ago (Ma). During ~ 30–13 Ma, eccentricity (orbital circularity) paced carbonate deposition. After the mid-Miocene Climate Transition (~ 14 Ma), precession (Earth's tilt direction) increasingly drove carbonate variability. In the latest Miocene (~ 8 Ma), obliquity (Earth's tilt) pacing appeared, signalling increasing high-latitude influence.