Articles | Volume 16, issue 1
Clim. Past, 16, 51–64, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-16-51-2020
Clim. Past, 16, 51–64, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-16-51-2020

Research article 09 Jan 2020

Research article | 09 Jan 2020

Reconstruction of the track and a simulation of the storm surge associated with the calamitous typhoon affecting the Pearl River Estuary in September 1874

Hing Yim Mok et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (30 Jul 2019) by Hans Linderholm
AR by Hing Yim Mok on behalf of the Authors (20 Aug 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (13 Sep 2019) by Hans Linderholm
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (21 Oct 2019)
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (27 Oct 2019)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (01 Nov 2019) by Hans Linderholm
AR by Svenja Lange on behalf of the Authors (12 Nov 2019)  Author's response
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (21 Nov 2019) by Hans Linderholm
AR by Svenja Lange on behalf of the Authors (26 Nov 2019)  Author's response
ED: Publish as is (26 Nov 2019) by Hans Linderholm
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Short summary
Using available information from historical documents, the maximum storm surge and storm tide at Hong Kong during the passage of a typhoon in 1874 were determined by reconstructing the possible typhoon track and found to be higher than all existing records since the 1883 establishment of the Hong Kong Observatory. This reveals that a more detailed frequency analysis of extreme sea levels taking the 1874 typhoon into account is essential for realistic storm surge risk assessments in Hong Kong.