Articles | Volume 16, issue 5
Clim. Past, 16, 1691–1713, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-16-1691-2020
Clim. Past, 16, 1691–1713, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-16-1691-2020

Research article 02 Sep 2020

Research article | 02 Sep 2020

An 83 000-year-old ice core from Roosevelt Island, Ross Sea, Antarctica

James E. Lee et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (06 Feb 2019) by Barbara Stenni
AR by James Lee on behalf of the Authors (19 Mar 2019)  Author's response
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (30 Mar 2019) by Barbara Stenni
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (19 May 2019)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (27 May 2019) by Barbara Stenni
AR by Anna Mirena Feist-Polner on behalf of the Authors (19 Jun 2019)  Author's response
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (29 Jun 2019) by Barbara Stenni
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (02 Jul 2019) by Barbara Stenni
AR by James Lee on behalf of the Authors (24 Jul 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
AR by Anna Wenzel on behalf of the Authors (14 Jul 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (19 Jul 2020) by Barbara Stenni
AR by James Lee on behalf of the Authors (20 Jul 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript

Post-review adjustments

AA: Author's adjustment | EA: Editor approval
AA by James Lee on behalf of the Authors (24 Aug 2020)   Author's adjustment   Manuscript
EA: Adjustments approved (28 Aug 2020) by Barbara Stenni
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Short summary
The Roosevelt Island ice core was drilled to investigate climate from the eastern Ross Sea, West Antarctica. We describe the ice age-scale and gas age-scale of the ice core for 0–763 m (83 000 years BP). Old ice near the bottom of the core implies the ice dome existed throughout the last glacial period and that ice streaming was active in the region. Variations in methane, similar to those used as evidence of early human influence on climate, were observed prior to significant human populations.