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Climate of the Past An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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CP | Articles | Volume 16, issue 4
Clim. Past, 16, 1509–1521, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-16-1509-2020
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Clim. Past, 16, 1509–1521, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-16-1509-2020
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 20 Aug 2020

Research article | 20 Aug 2020

Elevated CO2, increased leaf-level productivity, and water-use efficiency during the early Miocene

Tammo Reichgelt et al.

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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (25 Jun 2020) by Zhengtang Guo
AR by Tammo Reichgelt on behalf of the Authors (01 Jul 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (06 Jul 2020) by Zhengtang Guo
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
Carbon dioxide (CO2) levels are increasing in the atmosphere. CO2 has a direct fertilization effect on plants, meaning that plants can photosynthesize more and create more biomass under higher atmospheric CO2. This paper outlines the first direct evidence of a carbon fertilization effect on plants in Earth's past from 23 × 106 yr old fossil leaves, when CO2 was higher. This allowed the biosphere to extend into areas that are currently too dry or too cold for forests.
Carbon dioxide (CO2) levels are increasing in the atmosphere. CO2 has a direct fertilization...
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