Articles | Volume 12, issue 2
Clim. Past, 12, 189–200, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-12-189-2016
Clim. Past, 12, 189–200, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-12-189-2016

Research article 03 Feb 2016

Research article | 03 Feb 2016

A 250-year periodicity in Southern Hemisphere westerly winds over the last 2600 years

C. S. M. Turney et al.

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (06 Oct 2015) by Ed Brook
AR by Christian Turney on behalf of the Authors (16 Oct 2015)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by Editor) (13 Jan 2016) by Ed Brook
AR by Christian Turney on behalf of the Authors (13 Jan 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (17 Jan 2016) by Ed Brook
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Short summary
Southern Hemisphere westerly airflow is considered a major driver of Southern Ocean and global climate. Observational records, however, are limited. Here we present a new Falkland Islands record that exploits "exotic" South America pollen and charcoal to reconstruct changing airflow. We find stronger winds 2000–1000 cal. yr BP, associated with increased burning, and a 250-year periodicity, suggesting solar forcing. Our results have important implications for understanding late Holocene climates.