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Climate of the Past An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 12, issue 5
Clim. Past, 12, 1151–1163, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-12-1151-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Special issue: Climatic and biotic events of the Paleogene

Clim. Past, 12, 1151–1163, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-12-1151-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 13 May 2016

Research article | 13 May 2016

Environmental impact and magnitude of paleosol carbonate carbon isotope excursions marking five early Eocene hyperthermals in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming

Hemmo A. Abels et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (23 Sep 2015) by Gerald Dickens
AR by Hemmo Abels on behalf of the Authors (10 Dec 2015)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (14 Dec 2015) by Gerald Dickens
RR by Brian Schubert (11 Jan 2016)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by Editor) (05 Feb 2016) by Gerald Dickens
AR by Anna Wenzel on behalf of the Authors (14 Mar 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (14 Mar 2016) by Gerald Dickens
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
Ancient greenhouse warming episodes are studied in river floodplain sediments in the western interior of the USA. Paleohydrological changes of four smaller warming episodes are revealed to be the opposite of those of the largest, most-studied event. Carbon cycle tracers are used to ascertain whether the largest event was a similar event but proportional to the smaller ones or whether this event was distinct in size as well as in carbon sourcing, a question the current work cannot answer.
Ancient greenhouse warming episodes are studied in river floodplain sediments in the western...
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