Articles | Volume 11, issue 2
Clim. Past, 11, 135–152, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-11-135-2015
Clim. Past, 11, 135–152, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-11-135-2015
Research article
05 Feb 2015
Research article | 05 Feb 2015

Early deglacial Atlantic overturning decline and its role in atmospheric CO2 rise inferred from carbon isotopes (δ13C)

A. Schmittner and D. C. Lund

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Short summary
Model simulations of carbon isotope changes as a result of a reduction in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) agree well with sediment data from the early last deglaciation, supporting the idea that the AMOC was substantially reduced during that time period of global warming. We hypothesize, and present supporting evidence, that changes in the AMOC may have caused the coeval rise in atmospheric CO2, owing to a reduction in the efficiency of the ocean's biological pump.