Articles | Volume 11, issue 2
Clim. Past, 11, 135–152, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-11-135-2015
Clim. Past, 11, 135–152, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-11-135-2015

Research article 05 Feb 2015

Research article | 05 Feb 2015

Early deglacial Atlantic overturning decline and its role in atmospheric CO2 rise inferred from carbon isotopes (δ13C)

A. Schmittner and D. C. Lund

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Status: closed
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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Andreas Schmittner on behalf of the Authors (20 Sep 2014)  Author's response
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (24 Sep 2014) by Hubertus Fischer
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (12 Nov 2014)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (25 Nov 2014)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by Editor) (09 Dec 2014) by Hubertus Fischer
AR by Andreas Schmittner on behalf of the Authors (05 Jan 2015)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (08 Jan 2015) by Hubertus Fischer
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Short summary
Model simulations of carbon isotope changes as a result of a reduction in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) agree well with sediment data from the early last deglaciation, supporting the idea that the AMOC was substantially reduced during that time period of global warming. We hypothesize, and present supporting evidence, that changes in the AMOC may have caused the coeval rise in atmospheric CO2, owing to a reduction in the efficiency of the ocean's biological pump.