Articles | Volume 19, issue 12
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-19-2535-2023
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-19-2535-2023
Research article
 | 
12 Dec 2023
Research article |  | 12 Dec 2023

Reconstructing atmospheric H2 over the past century from bi-polar firn air records

John D. Patterson, Murat Aydin, Andrew M. Crotwell, Gabrielle Pétron, Jeffery P. Severinghaus, Paul B. Krummel, Ray L. Langenfelds, Vasilii V. Petrenko, and Eric S. Saltzman

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Short summary
Atmospheric levels of molecular hydrogen (H2) can impact climate and air quality. Constraining past changes to atmospheric H2 is useful for understanding how H2 cycles through the Earth system and predicting the impacts of increasing anthropogenic emissions under the hydrogen economy. Here, we use the aging air found in the polar snowpack to reconstruct H2 levels over the past 100 years. We find that H2 levels increased by 30 % over Greenland and 60 % over Antarctica during the 20th century.