Articles | Volume 18, issue 4
Clim. Past, 18, 775–792, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-18-775-2022
Clim. Past, 18, 775–792, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-18-775-2022
Research article
12 Apr 2022
Research article | 12 Apr 2022

Dynamic boreal summer atmospheric circulation response as negative feedback to Greenland melt during the MIS-11 interglacial

Brian R. Crow et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on cp-2021-118', Anonymous Referee #1, 20 Sep 2021
    • AC2: 'Reply to RC1', Brian Crow, 06 Dec 2021
  • RC2: 'Review of cp-2021-118', Alexander Robinson, 05 Oct 2021
    • AC3: 'Reply on RC2', Brian Crow, 06 Dec 2021
  • AC1: 'Thanks to Reviewers', Brian Crow, 08 Nov 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (24 Dec 2021) by Qiuzhen Yin
AR by Brian Crow on behalf of the Authors (31 Jan 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (07 Feb 2022) by Qiuzhen Yin
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (25 Feb 2022)
ED: Publish as is (28 Feb 2022) by Qiuzhen Yin
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Short summary
To better understand the climate conditions which lead to extensive melting of the Greenland ice sheet, we used climate models to reconstruct the climate conditions of the warmest period of the last 800 000 years, which was centered around 410 000 years ago. Surprisingly, we found that atmospheric circulation changes may have acted to reduce the melt of the ice sheet rather than enhance it, despite the extensive warmth of the time.