Articles | Volume 18, issue 3
Clim. Past, 18, 405–433, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-18-405-2022

Special issue: International methods and comparisons in climate reconstruction...

Clim. Past, 18, 405–433, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-18-405-2022

Research article 04 Mar 2022

Research article | 04 Mar 2022

Climate variability and grain production in Scania, 1702–1911

Martin Karl Skoglund

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on cp-2021-52', Anonymous Referee #1, 03 Jun 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Martin Skoglund, 23 Jun 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on cp-2021-52', Anonymous Referee #2, 30 Jun 2021
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Martin Skoglund, 15 Jul 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (11 Aug 2021) by Chantal Camenisch
AR by Martin Skoglund on behalf of the Authors (22 Sep 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (05 Oct 2021) by Chantal Camenisch
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (17 Oct 2021)
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (01 Nov 2021)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (17 Nov 2021) by Chantal Camenisch
AR by Martin Skoglund on behalf of the Authors (27 Nov 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (15 Dec 2021) by Chantal Camenisch
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Short summary
This article finds that grain farming in historical Scania (ca. 1700–1900) was adapted to wet and cold summers, while being resilient to frost and climate variability in the spring and autumn. These relationships started to change in the late 19th century with the introduction of new grain varieties, particularly autumn grain varieties. Nonetheless, historical farmers faced a threat in common with contemporary farmers, namely summer droughts, like the summer drought of 2018.