Articles | Volume 17, issue 1
Clim. Past, 17, 379–396, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-17-379-2021
Clim. Past, 17, 379–396, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-17-379-2021

Research article 08 Feb 2021

Research article | 08 Feb 2021

Response of biological productivity to North Atlantic marine front migration during the Holocene

David J. Harning et al.

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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (03 Dec 2020) by Bjørg Risebrobakken
AR by David Harning on behalf of the Authors (03 Dec 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (21 Dec 2020) by Bjørg Risebrobakken
AR by David Harning on behalf of the Authors (22 Dec 2020)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (04 Jan 2021) by Bjørg Risebrobakken
AR by David Harning on behalf of the Authors (04 Jan 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Today, the waters north of Iceland are characterized by high productivity that supports a diverse food web. However, it is not known how this may change and impact Iceland's economy with future climate change. Therefore, we explored how the local productivity has changed in the past 8000 years through fossil and biogeochemical indicators preserved in Icelandic marine mud. We show that this productivity relies on the mixing of Atlantic and Arctic waters, which migrate north under warming.