Articles | Volume 17, issue 1
Clim. Past, 17, 317–330, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-17-317-2021
Clim. Past, 17, 317–330, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-17-317-2021

Research article 29 Jan 2021

Research article | 29 Jan 2021

Greenland climate simulations show high Eemian surface melt which could explain reduced total air content in ice cores

Andreas Plach et al.

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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (18 Nov 2020) by Eric Wolff
AR by Andreas Plach on behalf of the Authors (27 Nov 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (01 Dec 2020) by Eric Wolff
AR by Andreas Plach on behalf of the Authors (02 Dec 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
Short summary
In light of recent large-scale melting of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS), e.g., in the summer of 2012 several days with surface melt on the entire ice sheet (including elevations above 3000 m), we use computer simulations to estimate the amount of melt during a warmer-than-present period of the past. Our simulations show more extensive melt than today. This is important for the interpretation of ice cores which are used to reconstruct the evolution of the ice sheet and the climate.