Articles | Volume 15, issue 6
Clim. Past, 15, 1985–1998, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-15-1985-2019
Clim. Past, 15, 1985–1998, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-15-1985-2019

Research article 28 Nov 2019

Research article | 28 Nov 2019

Can we use sea surface temperature and productivity proxy records to reconstruct Ekman upwelling?

Anson Cheung et al.

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Short summary
We test two assumptions that are often made in paleoclimate studies by using observations and ask whether temperature and productivity proxy records in the Southern California Current can be used to reconstruct Ekman upwelling. By examining the covariation between alongshore wind stress, temperature, and productivity, we found that the dominant covarying pattern does not reflect Ekman upwelling. Other upwelling patterns found are timescale dependent. Multiple proxies can improve reconstruction.