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Climate of the Past An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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CP | Articles | Volume 14, issue 6
Clim. Past, 14, 871–886, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-14-871-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Clim. Past, 14, 871–886, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-14-871-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 21 Jun 2018

Research article | 21 Jun 2018

High-latitude Southern Hemisphere fire history during the mid- to late Holocene (6000–750 BP)

Dario Battistel et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (29 Mar 2018) by Eric Wolff
AR by Anna Wenzel on behalf of the Authors (20 Apr 2018)  Author's response
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (27 Apr 2018) by Eric Wolff
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (07 May 2018)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (18 May 2018)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (31 May 2018) by Eric Wolff
AR by Lorena Grabowski on behalf of the Authors (12 Jun 2018)  Author's response
ED: Publish as is (14 Jun 2018) by Eric Wolff
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Short summary
From the analysis of an Antarctic ice core we showed that during the mid- to late Holocene (6000–750 BP) the long-term fire activity increased with higher rates starting at ~ 4000 BP and, more surprisingly, peaked between 2500 and 1500 BP. The anomalous increase in biomass burning centered at about 2000 BP is due to a complex interaction between changes in atmospheric circulation and biomass availability, with the main contribution coming from southern South America.
From the analysis of an Antarctic ice core we showed that during the mid- to late Holocene...
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