Articles | Volume 14, issue 6
Clim. Past, 14, 871–886, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-14-871-2018
Clim. Past, 14, 871–886, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-14-871-2018

Research article 21 Jun 2018

Research article | 21 Jun 2018

High-latitude Southern Hemisphere fire history during the mid- to late Holocene (6000–750 BP)

Dario Battistel et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (29 Mar 2018) by Eric Wolff
AR by Anna Wenzel on behalf of the Authors (20 Apr 2018)  Author's response
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (27 Apr 2018) by Eric Wolff
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (07 May 2018)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (18 May 2018)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (31 May 2018) by Eric Wolff
AR by Lorena Grabowski on behalf of the Authors (12 Jun 2018)  Author's response
ED: Publish as is (14 Jun 2018) by Eric Wolff
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Short summary
From the analysis of an Antarctic ice core we showed that during the mid- to late Holocene (6000–750 BP) the long-term fire activity increased with higher rates starting at ~ 4000 BP and, more surprisingly, peaked between 2500 and 1500 BP. The anomalous increase in biomass burning centered at about 2000 BP is due to a complex interaction between changes in atmospheric circulation and biomass availability, with the main contribution coming from southern South America.