Articles | Volume 14, issue 6
Clim. Past, 14, 811–824, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-14-811-2018
Clim. Past, 14, 811–824, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-14-811-2018
Research article
18 Jun 2018
Research article | 18 Jun 2018

Assessing the impact of large volcanic eruptions of the last millennium (850–1850 CE) on Australian rainfall regimes

Stephanie A. P. Blake et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 2,649 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
1,695 879 75 2,649 74 77
  • HTML: 1,695
  • PDF: 879
  • XML: 75
  • Total: 2,649
  • BibTeX: 74
  • EndNote: 77
Views and downloads (calculated since 25 Sep 2017)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 25 Sep 2017)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 2,514 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 2,503 with geography defined and 11 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Latest update: 20 May 2022
Download
Short summary
We studied the impact of the six largest tropical eruptions in reference to Australian precipitation, the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD), and El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Volcanic forcing increased the likelihood of El Niños and positive IODs (pIOD) and caused positive rainfall anomalies over north-west (NW) and south-east (SE) Australia. Larger sulfate loading caused more persistent pIOD and El Niños, enhanced precipitation over NW Australia, and dampened precipitation over SE Australia.