Articles | Volume 14, issue 3
Clim. Past, 14, 397–411, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-14-397-2018
Clim. Past, 14, 397–411, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-14-397-2018

Research article 23 Mar 2018

Research article | 23 Mar 2018

Land–sea coupling of early Pleistocene glacial cycles in the southern North Sea exhibit dominant Northern Hemisphere forcing

Timme H. Donders et al.

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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (20 Dec 2017) by Erin McClymont
AR by Timme H. Donders on behalf of the Authors (25 Jan 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (14 Feb 2018) by Erin McClymont
AR by Timme H. Donders on behalf of the Authors (20 Feb 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
The buildup and melting of ice during the early glaciations in the Northern Hemisphere, around 2.5 million years ago, were far shorter in duration than during the last million years. Based on molecular compounds and microfossils from sediments dating back to the early glaciations we show that the temperature on land and in the sea changed simultaneously and was a major factor in the ice buildup in the Northern Hemisphere. These data provide key insights into the dynamics of early glaciations.