Articles | Volume 14, issue 2
Clim. Past, 14, 193–214, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-14-193-2018
Clim. Past, 14, 193–214, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-14-193-2018

Research article 21 Feb 2018

Research article | 21 Feb 2018

The Ross Sea Dipole – temperature, snow accumulation and sea ice variability in the Ross Sea region, Antarctica, over the past 2700 years

Nancy A. N. Bertler et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (17 Nov 2017) by Hugues Goosse
AR by Nancy Bertler on behalf of the Authors (07 Dec 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (08 Dec 2017) by Hugues Goosse
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (26 Dec 2017)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (02 Jan 2018)
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (04 Jan 2018) by Hugues Goosse
AR by Nancy Bertler on behalf of the Authors (08 Jan 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Temperature and snow accumulation records from the annually dated Roosevelt Island Climate Evolution (RICE) ice core show that for the past 2 700 years, the eastern Ross Sea warmed, while the western Ross Sea showed no trend and West Antarctica cooled. From the 17th century onwards, this dipole relationship changed. Now all three regions show concurrent warming, with snow accumulation declining in West Antarctica and the eastern Ross Sea.