Articles | Volume 14, issue 11
Clim. Past, 14, 1639–1651, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-14-1639-2018
Clim. Past, 14, 1639–1651, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-14-1639-2018

Research article 07 Nov 2018

Research article | 07 Nov 2018

Change in the North Atlantic circulation associated with the mid-Pleistocene transition

Gloria M. Martin-Garcia et al.

Data sets

Stable isotope record, calcium carbonate conentrations, and sea surface temperture reconstructions of sediment cores from the North Atlantic W. F. Ruddiman, M. E. Raymo, D. G. Martinson, B. M. Clement, and J. Backman https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.701229

Subpolar North Atlantic mid-Pleistocene Faunal Census and SST Data A. K. Wright and B. P. Flower ftp://ftp.ncdc.noaa.gov/pub/data/paleo/contributions_by_author/wright2002/wright2002.txt

Stable oxygen isotopic record of foraminifera from IODP Site 339-U1385 D. A. Hodell, L. J. Lourens, S. J. Crowhurst, T. Y. M. Konijnendijk, R. Tjallingii, F. J. Jiménez-Espejo, L. C. Skinner, and P. C. Tzedakis https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.872082

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Short summary
This work documents major oceanographic changes that occurred in the N. Atlantic from 812 to 530 ka and were related to the mid-Pleistocene transition. Since ~ 650 ka, glacials were more prolonged and intense than before. Larger ice sheets may have worked as a positive feedback mechanism to prolong the duration of glacials. We explore the connection between the change in the N. Atlantic oceanography and the enhanced ice-sheet growth, which contributed to the change of cyclicity in climate.