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Climate of the Past An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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The Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) is prominent in the climate system. We study the AMO over the last 2000 years using a novel proxy framework, the Last Millennium Reanalysis. We find that the AMO is linked to continental warming, Arctic sea ice retreat, and an Atlantic precipitation shift. Low clouds decrease globally. We find no distinct multidecadal spectral peak in the AMO over the last 2 millennia, suggesting that human activities may have enhanced the AMO in the modern era.
CP | Articles | Volume 14, issue 2
Clim. Past, 14, 157–174, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-14-157-2018
Clim. Past, 14, 157–174, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-14-157-2018

Research article 09 Feb 2018

Research article | 09 Feb 2018

Insights into Atlantic multidecadal variability using the Last Millennium Reanalysis framework

Hansi K. A. Singh et al.

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Short summary
The Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) is prominent in the climate system. We study the AMO over the last 2000 years using a novel proxy framework, the Last Millennium Reanalysis. We find that the AMO is linked to continental warming, Arctic sea ice retreat, and an Atlantic precipitation shift. Low clouds decrease globally. We find no distinct multidecadal spectral peak in the AMO over the last 2 millennia, suggesting that human activities may have enhanced the AMO in the modern era.
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