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Climate of the Past An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 13, issue 7
Clim. Past, 13, 959–975, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-13-959-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Clim. Past, 13, 959–975, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-13-959-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 27 Jul 2017

Research article | 27 Jul 2017

Antarctic climate and ice-sheet configuration during the early Pliocene interglacial at 4.23 Ma

Nicholas R. Golledge et al.

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Short summary
We investigated how the Antarctic climate and ice sheets evolved during a period of warmer-than-present temperatures 4 million years ago, during a time when the carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere was very similar to today's level. Using computer models to first simulate the climate, and then how the ice sheets responded, we found that Antarctica most likely lost around 8.5  m sea-level equivalent ice volume as both East and West Antarctic ice sheets retreated.
We investigated how the Antarctic climate and ice sheets evolved during a period of...
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