Articles | Volume 13, issue 5
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-13-437-2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-13-437-2017
Research article
 | 
09 May 2017
Research article |  | 09 May 2017

A glaciochemical study of the 120 m ice core from Mill Island, East Antarctica

Mana Inoue, Mark A. J. Curran, Andrew D. Moy, Tas D. van Ommen, Alexander D. Fraser, Helen E. Phillips, and Ian D. Goodwin

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Short summary
A 120 m ice core from Mill Island, East Antarctica, was studied its chemical components. The Mill Island ice core contains 97 years of climate record (1913–2009) and has a mean snow accumulation of 1.35 m yr−1 (ice equivalent). Trace ion concentrations were generally higher than other Antarctic ice core sites. Nearby sea ice concentration was found to influence the annual mean sea salt record. The Mill Island ice core records are unexpectedly complex, with strong modulation of the trace chemistry.