Articles | Volume 11, issue 10
Clim. Past, 11, 1335–1346, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-11-1335-2015
Clim. Past, 11, 1335–1346, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-11-1335-2015

Research article 09 Oct 2015

Research article | 09 Oct 2015

Obliquity forcing of low-latitude climate

J. H. C. Bosmans et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (25 Jun 2015) by André Paul
AR by Anna Wenzel on behalf of the Authors (07 Aug 2015)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (07 Aug 2015) by André Paul
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (01 Sep 2015)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (10 Sep 2015)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by Editor) (12 Sep 2015) by André Paul
AR by Joyce Bosmans on behalf of the Authors (22 Sep 2015)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (28 Sep 2015) by André Paul
AR by Joyce Bosmans on behalf of the Authors (29 Sep 2015)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Our study shows that the influence of obliquity (the tilt of Earth's rotational axis) can be explained through changes in the insolation gradient across the tropics. This explanation is fundamentally different from high-latitude mechanisms that were previously often inferred to explain obliquity signals in low-latitude paleoclimate records, for instance glacial fluctuations. Our study is based on state-of-the-art climate model experiments.