Journal cover Journal topic
Climate of the Past An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

IF value: 3.536
IF3.536
IF 5-year value: 3.967
IF 5-year
3.967
CiteScore value: 6.6
CiteScore
6.6
SNIP value: 1.262
SNIP1.262
IPP value: 3.90
IPP3.90
SJR value: 2.185
SJR2.185
Scimago H <br class='widget-line-break'>index value: 71
Scimago H
index
71
h5-index value: 40
h5-index40
Volume 5, issue 4
Clim. Past, 5, 661–666, 2009
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-5-661-2009
© Author(s) 2009. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Clim. Past, 5, 661–666, 2009
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-5-661-2009
© Author(s) 2009. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

  30 Oct 2009

30 Oct 2009

Tree ring-based February–April temperature reconstruction for Changbai Mountain in Northeast China and its implication for East Asian winter monsoon

H. F. Zhu1,2, X. Q. Fang2, X. M. Shao1, and Z. Y. Yin3 H. F. Zhu et al.
  • 1Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
  • 2School of Geography, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China
  • 3Dept. of Marine Science and Environmental Studies, University of San Diego, San Diego, USA

Abstract. Long-term climatic records are scarce in the northeast Asia for understanding the behavior of the East Asian Winter Monsoon. Here we describe a 250-year February–April temperature reconstruction (TCBM) based on tree-ring widths of Korean Pines from the Changbai Mountain area, Northeast China. The reconstruction can account for 45.7% of the temperature variance in the instrumental period (1953 to 2001). Four cold periods including 1784–1815, 1827–1851, 1878–1889 and 1911–1945, and two warm periods of 1750–1783 and 1855–1877 were identified before the instrumental period. Four shifts were also detected at 1781, 1857, 1878 and 1989. Good agreements between TCBM and other temperature records of East Asia suggest that the reconstruction is of good reliability and captures the regional cold/warm periods of East Asia. Moreover, TCBM shows negative correlations with the instrumental or proxy-based EAWM intensity records. The known weakening of the EAWM in the late 1980s is in agreement with the shift at 1989 in TCBM. These comparisons suggest that the February–April temperature reconstruction may be a good indicator of the EAWM intensity.

Publications Copernicus
Download
Citation