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Climate of the Past An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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CP | Articles | Volume 15, issue 3
Clim. Past, 15, 913–926, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-15-913-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Clim. Past, 15, 913–926, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-15-913-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 22 May 2019

Research article | 22 May 2019

Antarctic temperature and CO2: near-synchrony yet variable phasing during the last deglaciation

Jai Chowdhry Beeman et al.

Model code and software

LinearFit 2.0 (plus CO2 and ATS3 Time Series Data) J. C. Beeman, F. Parrenin, and L. Gest https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.1221165

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Short summary
Atmospheric CO2 was likely an important amplifier of global-scale orbitally-driven warming during the last deglaciation. However, the mechanisms responsible for the rise in CO2, and the coherent rise in Antarctic isotopic temperature records, are under debate. Using a stochastic method, we detect variable lags between coherent changes in Antarctic temperature and CO2. This implies that the climate mechanisms linking the two records changed or experienced modulations during the deglaciation.
Atmospheric CO2 was likely an important amplifier of global-scale orbitally-driven warming...
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