Articles | Volume 15, issue 5
Clim. Past, 15, 1845–1859, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-15-1845-2019
Clim. Past, 15, 1845–1859, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-15-1845-2019

Research article 16 Oct 2019

Research article | 16 Oct 2019

Centennial-scale precipitation anomalies in the southern Altiplano (18° S) suggest an extratropical driver for the South American summer monsoon during the late Holocene

Ignacio A. Jara et al.

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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (10 Jun 2019) by Hans Linderholm
AR by Anna Wenzel on behalf of the Authors (12 Jun 2019)  Author's response
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (24 Jun 2019) by Hans Linderholm
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (23 Jul 2019)
RR by Anonymous Referee #4 (04 Aug 2019)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (04 Aug 2019) by Hans Linderholm
AR by Lorena Grabowski on behalf of the Authors (15 Aug 2019)  Author's response
ED: Publish as is (13 Sep 2019) by Hans Linderholm
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Short summary
The South American summer monsoon (SASM) is the most important climate system of South America. However, little is known about its long-term variability. Here we present a new SASM reconstruction from Lago Chungará in the southern Altiplano (18°S). We show important changes in SASM precipitation at timescales of centuries. Our results suggest that SASM variability was controlled not only by tropical climates but was also influenced by precipitation outside the tropics.